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September is National Honey Month!

Posted by National Honey Board on September 5, 2014 - 11:04 AM


September is National Honey Month!

It’s hard to imagine anything more pure and natural than one-ingredient honey. Produced by bees from the nectar of plants and flowers, honey essentially flows from hive to the table. With more than 300 different honey varietals found in the United States, all with a unique color and flavor, you are sure to find a honey varietal you will love.

The journey of honey begins with humble honey bees. Whether buzzing in their hives or foraging for nectar in wide open fields, honey bees are a critical component of today’s agricultural market. They perform the vital function of pollination, or the transferring of pollen from plant to plant, thus fertilizing the plants and enabling them to bear fruit. In fact, about one-third of the U.S. diet is derived from insect-pollinated plants and honey bees are responsible for about 80 percent of that process. Major crops that depend on honey bees for pollination consist of almonds, apples, avocados, blueberries – the list goes on and on.

For centuries, honey has been thought of as a kitchen staple, but honey is so much more than a culinary ingredient. Honey’s versatility is endless, spanning the bathroom vanity, the gym and even the medicine cabinet. Honey is a humectant, meaning it attracts and retains moisture, thus giving your skin a natural glow and the perfect ingredient to add to your beauty routine.  Honey is an effective and all-natural energy booster, containing approximately 17 grams of carbohydrates per tablespoon.  Finally, honey has been used for centuries as a natural cough suppressant, helping to soothe and relieves the irritation of a cough. 

All the wonderful benefits of honey could not be made possible without the incredible honey bee. The National Honey Board is committed to finding ways to help beekeepers maintain the health of their honey bees and was among the first to provide funding for Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) research in early 2007. Since 2004, the National Honey Board has funded multiple honey bee health research projects every year, which can be found on our website, here

This month, don’t forget to celebrate honey! There are so many wonderful ways to use honey that we could go on and on for days!

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