Honey’s Technical & Functional Properties

Honey’s Technical & Functional Properties

In this section you will find information on many of the technical and functional properties of honey and its use in the food industry.   The comprehensive Reference Guide covers a variety of technical information, while other fact sheets and documents cover specific topics about honey’s characteristics and use in food products.

Honey - A Reference Guide to Nature’s Sweetener (Rev. 2005)

Honey - A Reference Guide to Nature’s Sweetener (Rev. 2005)

This reference guide includes information on the following topics: Antimicrobial Properties, Antioxidants, Calories, Chemical Characteristics, Color, Composition, Crystallization, Diabetes, Dried Honey, Enzymes, Fermentation, Flavor Enhancement, Floral Sources, Freezing Point Depression, Glycemic Index, Grades, Heat Treatment, HMF, Infant Botulism, MIcrobiology, Nutrient Values, Pre- and Pro-biotics, Refractive Index, Specific Gravity, Specific Heat & Thermal Conductivity, Sports Nutrition, Storage, Sweetness, Viscosity, Water Activity.

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The Enzymes of Honey

Honey naturally contains small amounts of enzymes.  This paper describes the enzymes found in honey and their impact in food manufacturing. 

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Shelf-Life and Stability

Honey stored in sealed containers can remain stable for decades and even centuries! However, honey is susceptible to physical and chemical changes during storage; it tends to darken and lose its aroma and flavor.

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pH & Acids in Honey

A number of organic acids are known to occur in honey, including acetic, butyric, citric, formic, gluconic, lactic, malic, pyroglutamic, and succinic.

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Microorganisms in Honey

Knowledge of the moisture and temperature conditions influencing growth of microorganisms in honey has long been used to control the spoilage of honey.

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Honey Substitution Chart

On a sweetening basis, honey is about 25% sweeter than sugar or sucrose due to its fructose content.

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Filtration Methods

This article focuses on the membrane separation systems, ion exchange and adsorption because of their interest to the honey industry.

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Dried Honey

Dried honey products available commercially for industrial use are derived from pure liquid honey.

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Definition of Honey

Honey is the substance made when the nectar and sweet deposits from plants are gathered, modified and stored in the honeycomb by honey bees.

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Crystallization of Honey

While crystallization is usually undesirable in liquid honey, controlled crystallization can be used to make a desirable product.

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Carbohydrates and Honey

Because honey contains such a variety of carbohydrates and other nutrients, it is much more than just a sweetener.

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